Credo

 

In the Wisdom of the Scriptures it is seen that “The way of man is not in himself; it is not in man who walks to direct his own steps” (Jeremiah 10:23).  Here in the West we pride ourselves on the false notion of autonomy (which literally means self-law), and yet autonomy without being our brothers and sisters keeper is why we see such disregard for human life in the economic, religious, scientific and political arenas. When we see significant inequality of wealth, murder, rape, dehumanization philosophies of evolution, abortion, and political figures who are wicked shepherds serving themselves we must ask ourselves…is this path we are on – sustainable?  The “good way” and the “ancient paths” call out for us to distinguish between Right & Wrong – and to pursue justice, righteousness, truth, compassion, humility and selflessness; because inherent in these qualities represent the seeds that if sown upon the good ground will yield sustainable relationships, families, communities, businesses, and societies.

Unfortunately, many in the Christian faith have erred in believing that the passage in John 3:3 is about being “born-again” or “born-from-above” in order to get into Heaven.  The context of the verse according the Greek language reveals another story.  It speaks about receiving spiritual life from above (i.e. born-again) in order to CONSCIOUSLY experience and participate in the Kingdom of God NOW!  “Amen, Amen, I say to you, unless one is born again, he cannot see the Kingdom of God” (John 3:3).  The Greek gives a Subjunctive Mood, which means that this is a conditional statement that is pertinent upon the condition of those who have not been born-again; additionally, and because they are not born-again the Present Tense is used which means that they cannot at this moment in time see and participate in the Kingdom of God.  Therefore, to state this verse in positive terms “Amen, Amen, I say to you, when one is born-again, he sees the Kingdom of God.”  I have met hundreds of people who have given witness and testimony to the reality of receiving new life from God, a new identity, purpose, meaning and power.

In fact, to experience and walk in the “newness of life” (Romans 6:4; 7:6) is such a joy and rapture in the freedom of the spirit that no amount of money, fame, sex, drugs, food, or sleep could ever compare or be traded for this new life.  “Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new.  Now all things are of God, who has reconciled us to Himself through Jesus Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation, that is, that God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself, not imputing their trespasses to them, and has committed to us the word of reconciliation.  Now then, we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God were pleading through us: we implore you on Christ;s behalf, be reconciled to God.  For He made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him” (2 Corinthians 5:17-21).

Therefore, the sustainable solution to positively transforming the world is found in receiving new life from God, and new life from God is found in Christ – the Word of God made flesh – Who will take up residence and make a home within you (John 14:16-24) and within the one who comes to Him will by no means be cast out (John 6:37).  Understand this, that life is a precious gift that is to be cherished, honored, and ultimately redeemed.  New life from God does not destroy your personal identity and personality and purpose — it completes and fulfills it!

 


 

Here is “Creed” by Steve Turner:

*****

Creed

“We believe in Marxfreudanddarwin
We believe everything is OK
as long as you don’t hurt anyone,
to the best of your definition of hurt,
and to the best of your knowledge.

We believe in sex before, during, and after marriage.
We believe in the therapy of sin.
We believe that adultery is fun.
We believe that sodomy is OK.
We believe that taboos are taboo.

We believe that everything is getting better
despite evidence to the contrary.
The evidence must be investigated
And you can prove anything with evidence.

We believe there’s something in
horoscopes, UFO’s and bent spoons;
Jesus was a good man
just like Buddha, Mohammed, and ourselves.
He was a good moral teacher
although we think His good morals were bad.

We believe that all religions are basically the same–
at least the one that we read was.
They all believe in love and goodness.
They only differ on matters of
creation, sin, heaven, hell, God, and salvation.

We believe that after death comes the Nothing
Because when you ask the dead what happens they say nothing.
If death is not the end, if the dead have lied,
then it’s compulsory heaven for all
excepting perhaps Hitler, Stalin, and Genghis Khan.

We believe in Masters and Johnson.
What’s selected is average.
What’s average is normal.
What’s normal is good.

We believe in total disarmament.
We believe there are direct links between warfare and bloodshed.
Americans should beat their guns into tractors
and the Russians would be sure to follow.

We believe that man is essentially good.
It’s only his behavior that lets him down.
This is the fault of society.
Society is the fault of conditions.
Conditions are the fault of society.

We believe that each man must find the truth that is right for him.
Reality will adapt accordingly.
The universe will readjust.
History will alter.
We believe that there is no absolute truth
excepting the truth that there is no absolute truth.

We believe in the rejection of creeds,
and the flowering of individual thought.

“Chance” a post-script

If chance be the Father of all flesh,
disaster is his rainbow in the sky,
and when you hear

State of Emergency!
Sniper Kills Ten!
Troops on Rampage!
Whites go Looting!
Bomb Blasts School!

It is but the sound of man worshiping his maker.”  (i.e. himself).

____________________________________________________________

 

Consider these words well from the “Creed” by Steve Turner, and mark well the perfume of hypocrisy and the lack of coherent logic.

 

 

Peace be with each of you.

 

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Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony

The following section below represents a portion of “Our World Belongs to God” developed originally in 1986, and updated in 2008 by the Christian Reformed Church in North America.  For the full version, which has 58 sections click on the link below.  I originally came across this source in the book:

Our Faith: Ecumenical Creeds, Reformed Confessions, and Other Resources. Grand Rapids, MI: Faith Alive Christian Resources, 2013.

 

Let it be known that you and every person who has ever existed will give an account of how we have used our life-space, and that our thoughts, words, and actions will testify against us in this great accounting.  To be sure, that just as most children don’t like to be told what to do, so too, adults do not like to be told what to do.  Therefore, what is often the case is that we have “children in adult bodies” (see Matthew 11:16-19).  And…in our stubbornness and self-sufficiency we refuse to submit to the natural order of God’s Rule.  Saint Augustine eloquently said, “You have made us for Yourself, and our hearts are restless until they can find rest in you.”  If God does indeed exist (which I hope to address this issue in future posts) then the Most High Living God must be eternally superior to anything of the created order.  If this first principle is true, which indeed it is, then to elevate anything that is created above the Majesty and Perfection of God is to exalt the inferior over the superior – and to do so is logically foolish, ignorant, and sinful.  This has been the great charge of the sages, prophets, teachers, and apostles of the ages, namely, that we indeed are blind and even “willingly ignorant” until by the Grace of God our eyes are opened to see “as we ought to see.”

 

Let us learn what it means to “redeem the time” (Ephesians 5:15-16; Colossians 4:5-6) and to “put one the armor of Light” (Romans 13:12-14; Ephesians 6:10-18).  I hope you all enjoy the opening sections of this Contemporary Testimony.

Our World Belongs to God

Preamble
1. As followers of Jesus Christ,
living in this world—
which some seek to control,
and others view with despair—
we declare with joy and trust:
Our world belongs to God!

For God’s ownership of all things, see Psalm 24:1 (quoted in 1 Cor. 10:26), Job 41:11, and Deuteronomy 10:14. That this is also “our world”—given to the human race to keep and care for—is one of the themes of the creation stories in Genesis 1 and 2.

2. From the beginning,
through all the crises of our times,
until the kingdom fully comes,
God keeps covenant forever:
Our world belongs to God!
God is King: Let the earth be glad!
Christ is victor: his rule has begun!
The Spirit is at work: creation is renewed!
Hallelujah! Praise the Lord!

For God’s faithfulness, see, among many passages, Psalm 89, 117, 145; Romans 8:31-39; and Hebrews 10:23. For the victory of God in Christ and the rule of Christ, see 1 Corinthians 15:54-57, Philippians 2:9-11, and Revelation 1:13-18. For the Spirit’s work renewing creation, see Genesis 1 and Romans 8.

3. Still, despair and rebellious pride fill the earth:
some, crushed by failure
or broken by pain,
give up on life and hope and God;
others, shaken,
but still hoping for human triumph,
work feverishly to realize their dreams.
As believers in God,
we also struggle with the spirits of this age,
resisting them in the power of the Spirit,
testing them by God’s sure Word.

Psalm 2 expresses the rebellious spirit of the human race. See also Romans 1-3. Ephesians 6:10-17 describes the struggle of believers with the spirits of the age. On testing the spirits, see 1 John 4.

4. Our world, fallen into sin,
has lost its first goodness,
but God has not abandoned the work of his hands:
our Maker preserves this world,
sending seasons, sun, and rain,
upholding all creatures,
renewing the earth,
promising a Savior,
guiding all things to their purpose.

See Genesis 3; 9:8-16; Psalm 104, especially verse 30; Matthew 5:45; and Acts 14:17. For the promises of a Savior, see Genesis 3:15; Isaiah 7:14; 11:1-5; 42:1-7, 53; and Micah 5:2.

5. God holds this world
with fierce love.
Keeping his promise,
he sends Jesus into the world,
pours out the Holy Spirit,
and announces the good news:
sinners who repent and believe in Jesus
live anew as members of the family of God—
the firstfruits of a new creation.

For God’s fierce love, see Hosea 11, especially verses 10-11. For statements of the gospel message, see John 3:1-21, Acts 2:36-39, Romans 10:7-11, and Ephesians 2:1-10. For “firstfruits,” see Leviticus 23:9-14 and James 1:18.

6. We rejoice in the goodness of God,
renounce the works of darkness,
and dedicate ourselves to holy living.
As covenant partners,
set free for joyful obedience,
we offer our hearts and lives
to do God’s work in the world.
With tempered impatience,
eager to see injustice ended,
we expect the Day of the Lord.
We are confident
that the light
which shines in the present darkness
will fill the earth
when Christ appears.
Come, Lord Jesus.
Our world belongs to you.

Among the texts referenced in this paragraph, see Matthew 5:17-20, 48; John 1:1-5, 9-13; 3:19-21; Romans 12:1-2; Galatians 5:1, 13-25; 1 Thessalonians 4:16-5:11; 2 Peter 3; 1 John 2:7-11; and Revelation 22:20.

 

Creation

7. Our world belongs to God—
not to us or earthly powers,
not to demons, fate, or chance.
The earth is the Lord’s.

For references, see the first paragraph.

8. In the beginning, God—
Father, Word, and Spirit—
called this world into being
out of nothing,
and gave it shape and order.

See Genesis 1, where Creator, Word, and Spirit call creation into order. For the role of the Word in creation and Jesus as the Word, see John 1:1-14.

9. God formed sky, land, and sea;
stars above, moon and sun,
making a world of color, beauty, and variety—
a fitting home for plants and animals, and us—
a place to work and play,
worship and wonder,
love and laugh.
God rested
and gave us rest.
In the beginning
everything was very good.

On creation, besides Genesis 1 and 2, see Psalm 19; 33:6-9; and 104.

10. Made in God’s image
to live in loving communion with our Maker,
we are appointed earthkeepers and caretakers
to tend the earth, enjoy it,
and love our neighbors.
God uses our skills
for the unfolding and well-being of his world
so that creation and all who live in it may flourish.

For the image of God, see Genesis 1:26-27; 9:6; Ephesians 4:24; Colossians 3:10; and James 3:9.

11. Together,
male and female,
single and married,
young and old—
every hue and variety of humanity—
we are called to represent God,
for the Lord God made us all.
Life is God’s gift to us,
and we are called to foster
the well-being of all the living,
protecting from harm
the unborn and the weak,
the poor and the vulnerable.

See Genesis 1:26-27, Galatians 3:26-28, and Acts 2:5-11. On how we treat the vulnerable among us as a measure of justice, see Isaiah 1:15-17 and James 1:27.

12. Even now,
as history unfolds
in ways we know only in part,
we are assured
that God is with us in our world,
holding all things in tender embrace
and bending them to his purpose.
The confidence that the Lord is faithful
gives meaning to our days
and hope to our years.
The future is secure,
for our world belongs to God.

For the providential care of God, see Isaiah 45:6-7, Matthew 6:25-34, and Luke 12:4-7.

 

 

The highest pursuit in life is the pursuit of Truth.  Peace be with each of you.

 

 

Understanding the Image of God

“No one comes to the Father except through Me” (John 14:6b).  This statement is obviously true if one accepts that Jesus the Christ is in fact—“the truth” (John 14:6a).  However, Jesus had to make this claim, because the Christ or “the Messiah” is “the mystery which has been hidden from ages and from generations, but now has been revealed to His saints (lit. holy ones)” (Colossians 1:26), and the only way back to the pristine state as Adam was first formed is through the “last Adam,” (1 Corinthians 15:45; cf. Romans 5:14) Jesus the Christ.  Thus, Jesus Christ had to be born of a virgin and born of the Holy Spirit, because just as Adam was born from the breath of God (i.e. Spirit of God; Genesis 2:7) and the womb of the earth (i.e. dust) so too the “last Adam” had to be born of the Spirit of God (Matthew 1:20) from the womb of woman (Genesis 3:15).  This was done in order to reconcile the fallen state of man (cf. 2 Corinthians 5:17-20) when Adam died a spiritual death (cf. Genesis 2:17; 3:6-7).

 

Genesis 2:17 says, “For in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.”  It is clear from the biblical account that Adam lived some 900 years later (cf. Genesis 5:4-5) after “the day” when he partook of the fruit; however, the Rabbinical tradition took the Hebrew words mot tamut (i.e. “you shall surely die”) to literally mean, “dying, you will die.”  This in turn represents a Hebrew double idiom for a double death, hence a physical and spiritual death.  It is by virtue of this spiritual death that Jesus tells Nicodemus, “he must be born from above (or, born again) of the Spirit in order to see the Kingdom of God” (John 3:3-8; cf. 1 Peter 1:22-23).  However, the Holy Spirit renews all who are “born from above” back into the “image of His Son” (Romans 8:29), by being “transformed into the same image of the Lord from glory to glory” (τὴν αὐτὴν εἰκόνα μεταμορφούμεθα ἀπὸ δόξης εἰς δόξαν; 2 Corinthians 3:18).  The Spirit of God renews those “born from above” back into “the new man which was created according to God [past tense], in true righteousness and holiness” (Ephesians 4:24; cf. Genesis 1:26-17), and back into “the image of Him who created Him [past tense]” (Colossians 3:10), as “partakers of the divine nature” (2 Peter 1:4).

 

Before Jesus was manifested in the flesh, the prophets of old received “the Spirit of Christ who was in them was indicating when He testified beforehand the sufferings of Christ and the glories that would follow” (1 Peter 1:10-11).  Additionally, even Moses “esteemed the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures in Egypt” (Hebrews 11:26).  How can Moses and the prophets of old participate in the work of Christ or the work of the Messiah before the historical Jesus?

 

We see a clear picture that is formed which centers on the work of Christ (cf. 1 Corinthians 10:1-4) before His earthly mission, namely, the Christ is “the mystery which has been hidden from ages and from generations, but now has been revealed to His holy ones.  To them God willed to make known what are the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles/nations: which is Christ in you, the hope of glory” (Colossians 1:26-27).  This is the unveiling of the full participation and fellowship with the Godhead, namely with the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Therefore, a consistent thread or tapestry throughout the Bible is that the revelation of “the Christ” is to also partake in the process of “Christ being formed within” (Galatians 4:19) or as David says, “I shall be satisfied when I awake in Your Likeness” (Psalms 17:15).  Therefore, let us recognize why Christ Jesus came to earth, to suffer, die by crucifixion, be raised from the dead the third day (cf. Aramaic Targum of Hosea 6:2), and ascend to the Right Hand of YHVH.

 

Coming to the Father through Christ must necessitate a transformation by the Spirit of the Lord to “give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ” (2 Corinthians 4:6), because the “new man is renewed in knowledge…” (Colossians 3:10; cf. Proverbs 11:9).  Essentially, Paul uses the metaphor of the “new man, inner man, inward man, new creation” to refer to the process of being transformed into the Image of Christ (Romans 8:29), and it is the Image of Christ who is the original Image of God (2 Corinthians 4:4).

 

The Bible is very clear that Jesus Christ is the only way to the Father, Yahweh יהוה, because Christ represents the original birthright that humanity was originally created into before the spiritual death of Adam.  This is witnessed in Christ Jesus being exemplified as “the glory of Christ who is the image of God” (2 Corinthians 4:4), “He is the image of the invisible God” (Colossians 1:15), and “who being the brightness of His glory and the express image of His person” (Hebrews 1:3).  Thus, to reiterate, since humanity was created into the image of God (Genesis 1:26-27), and Christ is the image of God (2 Corinthians 4:4; Colossians 1:15; Hebrews 1:3), and those who have been “born from above” (John 3:3) are being transformed into the “same image of the Lord” (2 Corinthians 3:18), and are being “conformed to the image of His Son” (Romans 8:29) as the “inward man is being renewed day by day” (2 Corinthians 4:16) through the process of “Christ being formed within” (Galatians 4:19).

 

Therefore, we must ask ourselves and take a good look by examining ourselves (cf. 2 Corinthians 13:5; etc…) to see how we are expressing Christ in all domains of our lives.  Therefore, are you expressing Jesus Christ’s works in and through your life, not to even mention the greater works that we are promised we shall do (John 14:12)?  How are you “bringing every thought captive through the obedience of Christ” (2 Corinthians 10:5), or is this even a concern for you?  What is life all about, and are your behaviors, words, thoughts, emotions, and beliefs aligned with the two greatest commandments—Love Yahweh יהוה your God with all your heart, mind, soul, and strength – and to love your neighbor as yourself?  “Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God; and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God.  He who does not love does not know God, for God is love.  If someone says, “I love God,” and hates his brother, he is a liar; for he who does not love his brother whom he has seen, how can he love God whom he has not seen” (1 John 4:7-8, 20).

 

Now, what does this mean in the daily faith-walk of each believer?  All of this reveals that “The power of Christ may rest (lit. tabernacle, or abide upon) upon us” (2 Corinthians 12:9).  However, when it is discerned what it actually means to “have Christ in you” (Colossians 1:27), and “you in Christ” (Galatians 3:28) – then we can appreciate the spiritual language with its richness and depth by “comparing spiritual things with spiritual” (1 Corinthians 2:13).  When we get off the “milk” of the basic 101 spiritual teaching and dogma (and yes they are necessary—see Hebrews 6:1-3), and enter the realm of embodied direct experience with the Godhead (John 14:17, 20-21, 23; Ephesians 3:19; Revelation 3:20) then we can partake of “the good Word of God and the powers of the age to come” (Hebrews 6:5), yes, even in this life.  Let us call out to be genuinely cleansed of every wicked way within us (Psalms 139:23-24), and seek to be filled with the Spirit of God and Truth in order to serve our Maker and to serve His creation.  This is beautifully said by Paul the apostle, “For the love of Christ compels us, because we judge thus: that if One died for all, then all died; and He died for all, that those who live should live no longer for themselves, but for Him who died for them and rose again” (2 Corinthians 5:14-15).  Oh, what freedom there is in Christ!

 

Thus, as leaders our work is to embody God’s Word as the righteous scripture as “epistles of Christ” (2 Corinthians 3:1-3; cf. Colossians 3:16) by receiving the implanted Word on the good ground that has been tilled and prepared by life to receive it and bear fruit with patience and endurance (James 1:21; Luke 8:15; Jeremiah 4:3-4) and to train others (Matthew 28:20; 2 Timothy 2:4-5, 15) to put aside the lower games of the flesh that masquerade as culturally acceptable religious devotion and spirituality.  Because, “those who belong to Christ have already crucified the flesh with its passions and desires” (Galatians 5:24), so “it is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me; and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God” (Galatians 2:20).

 

Where is this in the Church (i.e. the People of God) today being actively expressed?  To be sure it is actively expressed by those whom the Father has trained and prepared.  Let us reason with what the Scriptures tell us.  What does living as Christ look like, what does it live like, what does it sound like, what does it breathe like, what does it feel like? What does it mean to be a sacrifice that is still living (Romans 12:1)?  What does it truly mean to “transform ourselves by renewing our mind” (Romans 12:2; cf. Ephesians 4:23), or by “setting our minds on things that are above, where Christ is…” (Colossians 3:1-4)?  How can God’s Word be firmly fixed in the Heavens, yet be hidden within our hearts (Psalms 119:11, 89)?  Think…does putting on the armor of Light and the Lord Jesus Christ simply entail behavior modification, or is there something more (Romans 13:12-14)???

 

Peace be with each of you.

 

 

 

Blinded by Vagueness…

This post is meant to sound provocative, because it is…Think about your beliefs.  What do you believe about the world, or about yourself, or about your relationships, or about God? Why do you have those beliefs?  What are the reasons that you have for believing in them?  What else?  Why else?

Think about it.  I have spoken to many people about a myriad topics, and I have witnessed time and time again, that we do not know “what we actually believe” and “why we believe it.”  Sure, we can share or spout off a quick five minute sound bite, but upon further inquiry – what do we really believe, and why?  If a loved one were to ask you right now, why do you love me – what would you tell them?  If your boss asked you why do you like working here, what would you say?  And, when you think about those responses is that what you really want to convey?  If so, great; if not – well, maybe we should dig a little deeper and discover more about ourselves and our beliefs.

Having spent some time in Seminary I have had a chance to speak with people about their beliefs in God, and I have noticed a significant amount of vagueness being verbalized.  Okay, you may believe in God – that’s great; but why do you believe in God?  Why else?  What does that belief mean for your life, in fact, what does it mean to believe in God?  Does that belief filter and shape your decisions, words, and behaviors?  Why?  What do you expect to happen as a result of your belief?  Who are you?  Who are you in relationship to God?  Is God beyond our ways of knowing, or is God immanent, or both?  Why?
Think about our goals in life.  How often do we set goals, and form clear reasons for why we want a specific outcome.  What will it “mean” for us if we achieve it or don’t achieve it, or what “will happen” if we achieve our goal or don’t achieve it?  Who will be affected from it?  Why?


What about our relationships?  Why do we love our friends, family, or significant other?  Why else?  Why else? What are relationships for?  What needs to happen to strengthen your relationships?  Do those whom you love, really know how much you care?

Getting clear within ourselves about our beliefs and why we believe them is a form of intrinsic motivation that can be sustainable to weather life’s storms.  Being clear about our reasons for what we believe in – is internalized power, because we are making ourselves consciously aware of our implicit assumptions about life.  Some of our beliefs stem from our parents, and we never really thought about why we believe what we do.  Other beliefs are formed from our experiences and the meanings we have attributed to those experiences.  But, what would happen if we began to evaluate our beliefs, maybe we would find some beliefs that don’t serve us or other, and maybe we would discover some beliefs that are useful and important to our core values.  In fact, what are your values?  Why?  What does having the value of _______ mean to you?  I realize that this post is a bombardment of questions, but others have noted that the questions we ask guide the answers we find.  Therefore; if we change, add, or adapt our questions we will find new answers.  Blinded by vagueness essentially means that if we are not clear about ourselves and what we believe and why we believe it; we are in a sense blinded by our assumptions of the world, and our relationships because our assumptions are vague generalities that lack the specifics and precision of clarity.  Questioning ourselves can be so liberating because it is extracting the implicit and making it explicit.