Fear of the Lord

 

My son, if your heart is wise, then my heart, too, will rejoice; and my kidneys will rejoice when your lips speak upright things. Let your heart not envy sinners, rather those in fear of Yahweh always. For there is a latter end, and your hope will not be cut off.

Proverbs 23:15-18

 

In contemplating and seeking to interpret the imperative command to fear the Lord it is necessary to search the Scriptures to discover the various nuances involved in carrying out this biblical injunction.  The Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments reveal that “fear” is a necessary experiential attitude that the people of God are to have toward Yahweh—the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.  For the modern mind terms like fear and jealousy seem to have a negative connotation; however, these terms have important theological connections both to our attitude towards God (i.e. fear) and God’s attitude towards His people (i.e. jealousy).  Fear can be a debilitating emotion when people are dealing with phobias of snakes, spiders, and elevators, but fear can also be a positive force towards preserving life such as seeing a shark at the beach, seeing a poisonous snake in the woods, or hearing a gun shot.  Yet, the biblical definition regarding the fear of the LORD is to depart from evil and do good (cf. Psalms 34:11-14).  However, there is a distinction which must be made, namely, (a) our personal way of defining good and evil (Proverbs 1:31), or (b) the ways and laws of God (Psalms 19:7-9; 119:1-176).  Therefore, the Holy Spirit through the Word of God must speak for itself regarding the paths of life and death.

The Scripture declares that the beginning of wisdom, and the beginning of knowledge both have their roots in the fear of the LORD Yahweh (Proverbs 1:7; 9:10).  In the Torah the command is given to honor the elderly and to fear your God—Yahweh (Leviticus 19:32).  Additionally, the fear of Yahweh is necessary in order to keep His commandments, statutes, and judgments; and that this fear will prolong our days (cf. Deuteronomy 6:1-3).  “The LORD commanded us to do all these statutes, to fear Yahweh our God for our good always, to keep us alive as it is this day” (Deuteronomy 6:24).  We see from these verses that the fear of the LORD (1) is for our good, (2) it prolongs our days, and (3) it enables us to keep the commandments, statutes, and judgments of God.

God’s covenant children are humbled and tested from time to time in order to do us good in the end (Deuteronomy 8:1-5, 16; Hebrews 12:5-11), so that we may walk in His ways and to fear Him (Deuteronomy 8:6).  Yet, the spirit and essence of the Law is revealed in this word…“And now, Israel, what does Yahweh your God require of you, but to fear Yahweh your God, to walk in His ways and to love Him, to serve Yahweh your God with all your heart and with all your soul…you shall love Yahweh your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with your very all (Deuteronomy 10:12; 6:5).  Thus, “whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him” (Colossians 3:17).  So the Scriptures declare that God requires us to fear Him, yet not in an incapacitating fear, but in a way that gives true life to our souls through submission to His will by the Holy Spirit.  Therefore, our spiritual growth in progressive sanctification is a constant training in learning how to fear Yahweh always (cf. Deuteronomy 14:23; Proverbs 23:17).  However, what is the fear of the LORD?  What does it actually mean?  How can I actually learn to fear Yahweh always?

 

  1. The fear of the LORD represents an awe of the majesty of God – Deuteronomy 10:14; Psalm 22:23; 25:14; 33:18; 103:17. As we contemplate the universe above and the majestic beauty of the earth, the myriad creatures, the complexity of DNA-RNA, and to our bodies from organs, tissues, cells, molecules, atoms, and sub-atomic particles, namely all things being held together by God’s Sovereign Decree.  So we declare with the Psalmist, “I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made; marvelous are Your works, and that my soul knows very well” (Psalm 139:14)

 

  1. The fear of the LORD represents a fearful dread – Psalm 96:9; 102:15; Proverbs 1:29; Isaiah 8:11-15; Malachi 1:6; 3:5; 2 Corinthians 7:9-12; Hebrews 10:26-31. Once we have received new life through Jesus Christ by His one offering, He has perfected forever those who are being sanctified (Hebrews 10:14), and in this new life there are times when our affections are turned away from God and our desires conceive and give birth to sin (Genesis 4:7; James 1:14-15).  Thus, a life of repentance (Mark 1:15) is necessary to restore our confidence (1 John 2:28).  Yet, there are times when we are to recognize the power of justice (Psalm 50:21) against unrighteousness, and this healthy dread is necessary from time to time so we do not degrade the holiness of God into a common thing. The Westminster Confession of Faith (WCF) in Chapter 14.2 on Saving Faith states, “By this faith, a Christian believeth to be true whatsoever is revealed in the Word, for the authority of God Himself speaking therein; and acteth differently upon that which each particular passage thereof containeth; yielding obedience to the commands, trembling at the threatenings (cf. Ezra 9:4; Isaiah 66:2; Hebrews 4:1), and embracing the promises of God for this life, and that which is to come.  But the principal acts of saving faith are accepting, receiving, and resting upon Christ alone for justification, sanctification, and eternal life, by virtue of the covenant of grace” (WCF 14.2).

 

  1. The fear of the LORD represents a continuous consciousness of God – Deuteronomy 14:23; Psalm 36:1; Proverbs 2:1-5; 23:17; Malachi 3:16. To have a fear of God actually means to be aware of God.  To be aware of God reveals an immediate knowing that we are subordinate to God since we are His creation.  To know that we are subordinate to God means that all “Blessing and honor and glory and power be to Him who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb, forever and ever” (Revelation 5:13).  However, this conscious awareness of God can have a blend of the dread and fear associated to Yahweh’s holiness, as well as an intimate nearness of His Fatherhood and provision from the majesty of His glorious works.  Additionally, there are eight processes given in Proverbs 2:1-4 which ultimately lead to an understanding of the fear of Yahweh and the discovery of the knowledge of God.  These eight processes are (1) receiving God’s Word, (2) treasuring His commands within, (3) inclining our ear to wisdom, (4) applying our heart to understanding, (5) crying out for discernment, (6) lifting up our voice for understanding, (7) seeking wisdom as if it were silver, and (8) searching for wisdom as if it were hidden treasures.  These eight actions have been summed up by Jesus when He commands us to ask, seek, and knock (Matthew 7:7-11; Luke 11:9-13).

 

  1. The Fear of the LORD represents the instruction of wisdom, namely, the way of life – Joshua 24:14; Psalm 34:11-16; 103:17; 128:1-4; Proverbs 14:25-27; 15:33; 16:6; 19:23; 29:25; Jeremiah 32:37-41. The commandments, laws, ordinances, statues, judgments, testimonies, and words of Yahweh are revealed and given unto us so that we may learn to do good and seek justice (cf. Isaiah 1:16-17), seek peace (cf. Psalm 34:14), to love mercy and to walk humbly with our God (cf. Micah 6:8), while also departing from evil, and keeping our tongue from corrupt communication and our lips from speaking deceit (Psalm 34:13-14; Ephesians 4:29-5:7).  God has ordained what is good and evil, and the paths that He has commanded us to walk in are for our good and well-being, and length of days; therefore, we are to fear God because reproofs of instruction are the way of life (Deuteronomy 5:16; 29, 33; 6:3, 18, 24; Proverbs 6:23).

 

As we begin to absorb the sweetness of God’s Word and allow it to dwell richly within us we will cry out to be “cleansed from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit” we will begin to experience the “perfecting holiness in the fear of God” (2 Corinthians 7:1).  The fear of the LORD is an important factor in our spiritual communion with God, because (a) it gives us wisdom in the way we should walk (Psalm 34:11-14), (b) it gives the ordering of the right relationships we should have toward ourselves (Proverbs 1:31; Jeremiah 17:9-10), others (Psalm 118:8-9), and with our Creator (Psalm 27:1-3; Habakkuk 3:17-19), (c) the fear of the LORD Yahweh is a means of grace for communion with the Most High God, and (d) the Holy Spirit which indwells all adopted children of God, also represents the Spirit of the fear of Yahweh (Isaiah 11:1-2).  Therefore, allow the fear of the LORD to be a driving force for your obedience to God.  Let us go forward and “lay aside every weight, and the sin which so easily ensnares us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith, who for the joy that was set before Him endured the cross, despising the shame, and has sat down at the right hand of the throne of God” (Hebrews 12:1-2).

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Raised with Christ-Messiah

 

But God, who is rich in mercy, because of His great love with which He loved us, even when we were dead in trespasses, made us alive together with Christ (by grace you have been saved), and raised us up together, and made us sit together in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, that in the ages to come He might show the exceeding riches of His grace in His kindness toward us in Christ Jesus.”

~ Ephesians 2:4-7


What does it mean to be raised with Christ?  Is this something that only happens when we pass from this life to the next through what is commonly called physical death?  The answer is a simple—no.  A revelatory notion in Scripture is that we can indeed be dead [to the life of God], when in fact our physical bodies are still alive [in this world].  Whereby Jesus says, “Follow me, and let the dead bury their own dead” (Matthew 8:22); or Paul when he says, “But she who lives in pleasure is dead while she lives” (1 Timothy 5:6).

So although we can be dead [to God] and yet alive [according to the flesh]; yet, we can also be dead according to the flesh [i.e. old man—Romans 6:6-9] and also alive with God.  For we are to be “united together in the likeness of His [Jesus] death” (Romans 6:5), because “If you live according to the flesh you will die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live” (Romans 8:13).  However, although we are still in the physical body, we are not in the fleshly consciousness of setting our minds on earthly things (Romans 8:5-6; 2 Corinthians 10:2-3).  This is what it means to actually experience what Christ Jesus says when “we are not of the world” (John 17:14, 16), but “we are in the world” (John 17:11).  To not simply believe that we are strangers upon this earth, but to actually know our identity in Christ so strongly that our faith is fixed upon the Rock that is unshakable (Psalm 61:1-4).

When we think about being raised with Christ it should be made clear that we can be raised with Christ now while we live in the flesh, although we do not war according to the flesh (2 Corinthians 10:3).  What does this mean?  It means very literally that there is an aspect of you sitting in the heavenly places in Christ—now (Ephesians 2:6; Philippians 3:20-21; Colossians 3:1-4).  Thus, this spiritual reality is what Paul groaned for and earnestly desired in order to be clothed with (2 Corinthians 5:2-4).  Therefore, we too should deeply desire to be clothed with our habitation which is from heaven, now in this moment.  This refers to our ability through the grace of God by having our “senses exercised to discern both good and evil” (Hebrews 5:14), and by “yielding the peaceable fruit of righteousness by being trained” from the Holy Spirit via our life experiences to “be transformed by renewing our minds” (Hebrews 12:11; Romans 12:2).

To be raised with Christ refers to the work of God moving through our lives, which manifests in such a way so as to literally “seek first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness” (Matthew 6:33).  But “how” do we seek first the Kingdom of God, and His righteousness?  We do this by actively and consciously pursuing God, “In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths” (Proverbs 3:6).  How do we acknowledge God in all of our ways?  We do it by “guarding our hearts with all diligence” (Proverbs 4:23).  How do we guard our hearts with all diligence?  By seeking to acknowledge and prioritize our lives by seeking Yahweh with our thoughts, emotions, will, words, actions, that is, with our entire being at all times by mustering as much strength and intensity (Isaiah 64:7) as we can to love Yahweh our God and to seek His counsel and strength.  Let us not simply come to the cross of Christ, let us also get on the cross and be crucified, namely, we must die to ourselves (2 Corinthians 5:14-15; Galatians 5:24).  Additionally, we do this by walking in the Spirit (Romans 8:14; Galatians 5:16, 22-25) seeking to embody spiritual fruit in order to love God and humanity in truth (Mark 12:29-31; John 13:34-35; Galatians 5:6, 13-14), and to worship God in the beauty of holiness by means of spirit and in truth (Psalms 29:2; John 4:23-24).  However, to be raised with Christ, it is the Father who draws us that we may die with Christ (John 6:44; Romans 6:1-4; Colossians 2:20; 3:1), because it is the Father who has delivered us from the power of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of the Son of His love, in whom we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins (Colossians 1:13-14).  Once we have truly been “born from above” or regenerated by the Spirit of God we are now truly free to serve God in the newness of life by seeking our true Life from above which is hidden with Christ in God.

But how do we live this life where God comes first in ordering our thoughts, emotions, words, and actions?  From my experiences in life it comes from two specific changes in one’s being.  First, it comes from literally being “born from above” (i.e. born again) – which is revealed by knowing, growing into, and daily experiencing who you truly are in Christ, which is the washing of regeneration and renewing of the Holy Spirit (2 Corinthians 4:16-5:9; Titus 3:4-7).  In a word it is by having a new life and a new identity.  Second, it comes from a renewed will (Psalms 16:8; Romans 12:1-2) that longs to please Him who has called us out of darkness into His marvelous Light (1 Peter 2:9).  This “renewed will” is not divorced from this new identity, but it naturally seeks through careful study to imitate our Heavenly Father’s characteristics and holy attributes embodied in Christ Jesus—no matter the cost or sacrifice.

 

 

Peace be with each of you.

 

 

Understanding the Image of God

“No one comes to the Father except through Me” (John 14:6b).  This statement is obviously true if one accepts that Jesus the Christ is in fact—“the truth” (John 14:6a).  However, Jesus had to make this claim, because the Christ or “the Messiah” is “the mystery which has been hidden from ages and from generations, but now has been revealed to His saints (lit. holy ones)” (Colossians 1:26), and the only way back to the pristine state as Adam was first formed is through the “last Adam,” (1 Corinthians 15:45; cf. Romans 5:14) Jesus the Christ.  Thus, Jesus Christ had to be born of a virgin and born of the Holy Spirit, because just as Adam was born from the breath of God (i.e. Spirit of God; Genesis 2:7) and the womb of the earth (i.e. dust) so too the “last Adam” had to be born of the Spirit of God (Matthew 1:20) from the womb of woman (Genesis 3:15).  This was done in order to reconcile the fallen state of man (cf. 2 Corinthians 5:17-20) when Adam died a spiritual death (cf. Genesis 2:17; 3:6-7).

 

Genesis 2:17 says, “For in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.”  It is clear from the biblical account that Adam lived some 900 years later (cf. Genesis 5:4-5) after “the day” when he partook of the fruit; however, the Rabbinical tradition took the Hebrew words mot tamut (i.e. “you shall surely die”) to literally mean, “dying, you will die.”  This in turn represents a Hebrew double idiom for a double death, hence a physical and spiritual death.  It is by virtue of this spiritual death that Jesus tells Nicodemus, “he must be born from above (or, born again) of the Spirit in order to see the Kingdom of God” (John 3:3-8; cf. 1 Peter 1:22-23).  However, the Holy Spirit renews all who are “born from above” back into the “image of His Son” (Romans 8:29), by being “transformed into the same image of the Lord from glory to glory” (τὴν αὐτὴν εἰκόνα μεταμορφούμεθα ἀπὸ δόξης εἰς δόξαν; 2 Corinthians 3:18).  The Spirit of God renews those “born from above” back into “the new man which was created according to God [past tense], in true righteousness and holiness” (Ephesians 4:24; cf. Genesis 1:26-17), and back into “the image of Him who created Him [past tense]” (Colossians 3:10), as “partakers of the divine nature” (2 Peter 1:4).

 

Before Jesus was manifested in the flesh, the prophets of old received “the Spirit of Christ who was in them was indicating when He testified beforehand the sufferings of Christ and the glories that would follow” (1 Peter 1:10-11).  Additionally, even Moses “esteemed the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures in Egypt” (Hebrews 11:26).  How can Moses and the prophets of old participate in the work of Christ or the work of the Messiah before the historical Jesus?

 

We see a clear picture that is formed which centers on the work of Christ (cf. 1 Corinthians 10:1-4) before His earthly mission, namely, the Christ is “the mystery which has been hidden from ages and from generations, but now has been revealed to His holy ones.  To them God willed to make known what are the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles/nations: which is Christ in you, the hope of glory” (Colossians 1:26-27).  This is the unveiling of the full participation and fellowship with the Godhead, namely with the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Therefore, a consistent thread or tapestry throughout the Bible is that the revelation of “the Christ” is to also partake in the process of “Christ being formed within” (Galatians 4:19) or as David says, “I shall be satisfied when I awake in Your Likeness” (Psalms 17:15).  Therefore, let us recognize why Christ Jesus came to earth, to suffer, die by crucifixion, be raised from the dead the third day (cf. Aramaic Targum of Hosea 6:2), and ascend to the Right Hand of YHVH.

 

Coming to the Father through Christ must necessitate a transformation by the Spirit of the Lord to “give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ” (2 Corinthians 4:6), because the “new man is renewed in knowledge…” (Colossians 3:10; cf. Proverbs 11:9).  Essentially, Paul uses the metaphor of the “new man, inner man, inward man, new creation” to refer to the process of being transformed into the Image of Christ (Romans 8:29), and it is the Image of Christ who is the original Image of God (2 Corinthians 4:4).

 

The Bible is very clear that Jesus Christ is the only way to the Father, Yahweh יהוה, because Christ represents the original birthright that humanity was originally created into before the spiritual death of Adam.  This is witnessed in Christ Jesus being exemplified as “the glory of Christ who is the image of God” (2 Corinthians 4:4), “He is the image of the invisible God” (Colossians 1:15), and “who being the brightness of His glory and the express image of His person” (Hebrews 1:3).  Thus, to reiterate, since humanity was created into the image of God (Genesis 1:26-27), and Christ is the image of God (2 Corinthians 4:4; Colossians 1:15; Hebrews 1:3), and those who have been “born from above” (John 3:3) are being transformed into the “same image of the Lord” (2 Corinthians 3:18), and are being “conformed to the image of His Son” (Romans 8:29) as the “inward man is being renewed day by day” (2 Corinthians 4:16) through the process of “Christ being formed within” (Galatians 4:19).

 

Therefore, we must ask ourselves and take a good look by examining ourselves (cf. 2 Corinthians 13:5; etc…) to see how we are expressing Christ in all domains of our lives.  Therefore, are you expressing Jesus Christ’s works in and through your life, not to even mention the greater works that we are promised we shall do (John 14:12)?  How are you “bringing every thought captive through the obedience of Christ” (2 Corinthians 10:5), or is this even a concern for you?  What is life all about, and are your behaviors, words, thoughts, emotions, and beliefs aligned with the two greatest commandments—Love Yahweh יהוה your God with all your heart, mind, soul, and strength – and to love your neighbor as yourself?  “Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God; and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God.  He who does not love does not know God, for God is love.  If someone says, “I love God,” and hates his brother, he is a liar; for he who does not love his brother whom he has seen, how can he love God whom he has not seen” (1 John 4:7-8, 20).

 

Now, what does this mean in the daily faith-walk of each believer?  All of this reveals that “The power of Christ may rest (lit. tabernacle, or abide upon) upon us” (2 Corinthians 12:9).  However, when it is discerned what it actually means to “have Christ in you” (Colossians 1:27), and “you in Christ” (Galatians 3:28) – then we can appreciate the spiritual language with its richness and depth by “comparing spiritual things with spiritual” (1 Corinthians 2:13).  When we get off the “milk” of the basic 101 spiritual teaching and dogma (and yes they are necessary—see Hebrews 6:1-3), and enter the realm of embodied direct experience with the Godhead (John 14:17, 20-21, 23; Ephesians 3:19; Revelation 3:20) then we can partake of “the good Word of God and the powers of the age to come” (Hebrews 6:5), yes, even in this life.  Let us call out to be genuinely cleansed of every wicked way within us (Psalms 139:23-24), and seek to be filled with the Spirit of God and Truth in order to serve our Maker and to serve His creation.  This is beautifully said by Paul the apostle, “For the love of Christ compels us, because we judge thus: that if One died for all, then all died; and He died for all, that those who live should live no longer for themselves, but for Him who died for them and rose again” (2 Corinthians 5:14-15).  Oh, what freedom there is in Christ!

 

Thus, as leaders our work is to embody God’s Word as the righteous scripture as “epistles of Christ” (2 Corinthians 3:1-3; cf. Colossians 3:16) by receiving the implanted Word on the good ground that has been tilled and prepared by life to receive it and bear fruit with patience and endurance (James 1:21; Luke 8:15; Jeremiah 4:3-4) and to train others (Matthew 28:20; 2 Timothy 2:4-5, 15) to put aside the lower games of the flesh that masquerade as culturally acceptable religious devotion and spirituality.  Because, “those who belong to Christ have already crucified the flesh with its passions and desires” (Galatians 5:24), so “it is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me; and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God” (Galatians 2:20).

 

Where is this in the Church (i.e. the People of God) today being actively expressed?  To be sure it is actively expressed by those whom the Father has trained and prepared.  Let us reason with what the Scriptures tell us.  What does living as Christ look like, what does it live like, what does it sound like, what does it breathe like, what does it feel like? What does it mean to be a sacrifice that is still living (Romans 12:1)?  What does it truly mean to “transform ourselves by renewing our mind” (Romans 12:2; cf. Ephesians 4:23), or by “setting our minds on things that are above, where Christ is…” (Colossians 3:1-4)?  How can God’s Word be firmly fixed in the Heavens, yet be hidden within our hearts (Psalms 119:11, 89)?  Think…does putting on the armor of Light and the Lord Jesus Christ simply entail behavior modification, or is there something more (Romans 13:12-14)???

 

Peace be with each of you.

 

 

 

New Product: Names of God, Divine Prayers & Sacred Words

DDN - Cover

 

Two Products:

  • Names of God, Divine Prayers & Sacred Words
  • Doctrine of the Divine Names

Print spiral bound book.  Please allow up to 2-4 weeks for delivery

 

Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words

 

∴ Over 400 Holy Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words in Hebrew/Aramaic
∴ Learn the Ancient Language of the Kings, Sages, and Prophets of God
∴ The most comprehensive list and teaching on the Divine Names available
∴ Each listing provides: the (1) transliterated Hebrew pronunciation, (2) the Bible book and verse, (3) the English meaning of the Hebrew word(s), and (4) the actual Hebrew text (EZRA SIL SR font) from the Hebrew Bible – Click here for EXAMPLE
∴ Included: Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words and the Doctrine of the Divine Names (126 pages total – spiral bound)
∴ A pronunciation guide is included
∴ The Lord’s Prayer in Hebrew is included

 

The Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words provide a comprehensive approach for understanding and implanting the Word of Truth within. “The entirety of Your Word is Truth” and as you genuinely pursue Truth “you shall know the Truth, and the Truth shall make you free” (Psalms 119:160; John 8:32). The listing provided is not a complete or exhaustive list from the Hebrew Bible (i.e. Old Testament); however, it is comprehensive because there are well over 400 entries. This work totals 126 pages and includes Doctrine of the Divine Names. Learn to speak the Hebrew Language!
The Word of God and the Names of God inherent in the Word provide a sacred link for the heart, mind, soul, and spirit to reach beyond the “things that are seen” (cf. 2 Corinthians 4:16-18) in order to lay hold of the hope that enters the Divine Presence behind the veil (cf. Hebrews 6:18-20). Therefore, the Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words serve by preparing and introducing us to the Holy Attributes and Expressions of God. These Names of God help us to know and understand the vast dimensions of the Heavens, the House of many mansions. So let us draw near with a pure heart and with song, dance, and jubilation.

 

Doctrine of the Divine Names

 

 

The Doctrine of the Divine Names provides a spiritual and practical teaching based on the Holy Scriptures for understanding the Names of God, and how to utilize them in a holy way as a spiritual discipline to experience a closer relationship with the Living God. The teaching comprises 32 pages full of Biblical verses for further study, while revealing the teaching of the Divine Names within the Bible, and how one is to approach the subject.  Sections include: Preface, Introduction, Understanding the Name, Practical Application, Biblical Meditation, and Recapitulation.

 

Realize that properly understanding the Biblical approach to the Divine Names of God will give you new ways of approaching the Living God.  The Names of God serve in many different ways for your spiritual transformation and for God’s Glory, and there are various ways to appropriately utilize and call upon the Living God so take the time to acquire the knowledge of the Doctrine of the Divine Names.  This teaching is for all peoples seeking a closer relationship with the Eternal Divine!

Click here for an EXAMPLE:

 

 

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