New Product: Names of God, Divine Prayers & Sacred Words

DDN - Cover

 

Two Products:

  • Names of God, Divine Prayers & Sacred Words
  • Doctrine of the Divine Names

Print spiral bound book.  Please allow up to 2-4 weeks for delivery

 

Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words

 

∴ Over 400 Holy Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words in Hebrew/Aramaic
∴ Learn the Ancient Language of the Kings, Sages, and Prophets of God
∴ The most comprehensive list and teaching on the Divine Names available
∴ Each listing provides: the (1) transliterated Hebrew pronunciation, (2) the Bible book and verse, (3) the English meaning of the Hebrew word(s), and (4) the actual Hebrew text (EZRA SIL SR font) from the Hebrew Bible – Click here for EXAMPLE
∴ Included: Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words and the Doctrine of the Divine Names (126 pages total – spiral bound)
∴ A pronunciation guide is included
∴ The Lord’s Prayer in Hebrew is included

 

The Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words provide a comprehensive approach for understanding and implanting the Word of Truth within. “The entirety of Your Word is Truth” and as you genuinely pursue Truth “you shall know the Truth, and the Truth shall make you free” (Psalms 119:160; John 8:32). The listing provided is not a complete or exhaustive list from the Hebrew Bible (i.e. Old Testament); however, it is comprehensive because there are well over 400 entries. This work totals 126 pages and includes Doctrine of the Divine Names. Learn to speak the Hebrew Language!
The Word of God and the Names of God inherent in the Word provide a sacred link for the heart, mind, soul, and spirit to reach beyond the “things that are seen” (cf. 2 Corinthians 4:16-18) in order to lay hold of the hope that enters the Divine Presence behind the veil (cf. Hebrews 6:18-20). Therefore, the Names of God, Divine Prayers and Sacred Words serve by preparing and introducing us to the Holy Attributes and Expressions of God. These Names of God help us to know and understand the vast dimensions of the Heavens, the House of many mansions. So let us draw near with a pure heart and with song, dance, and jubilation.

 

Doctrine of the Divine Names

 

 

The Doctrine of the Divine Names provides a spiritual and practical teaching based on the Holy Scriptures for understanding the Names of God, and how to utilize them in a holy way as a spiritual discipline to experience a closer relationship with the Living God. The teaching comprises 32 pages full of Biblical verses for further study, while revealing the teaching of the Divine Names within the Bible, and how one is to approach the subject.  Sections include: Preface, Introduction, Understanding the Name, Practical Application, Biblical Meditation, and Recapitulation.

 

Realize that properly understanding the Biblical approach to the Divine Names of God will give you new ways of approaching the Living God.  The Names of God serve in many different ways for your spiritual transformation and for God’s Glory, and there are various ways to appropriately utilize and call upon the Living God so take the time to acquire the knowledge of the Doctrine of the Divine Names.  This teaching is for all peoples seeking a closer relationship with the Eternal Divine!

Click here for an EXAMPLE:

 

 

 Click here to go to purchase site:

 

 

Ra Lovingsworth

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A Theory About Life & Leadership – Part 4

Well this is going to wrap up some of the ideas and concepts I have been germinating over the years.  This post will refine some concepts and clarify potential confusions, as well as update the Emergent Leadership concept to my initial title of “Risk to Lead Theory” (RLT).  Although the name Emergent Leadership does correlate with the concepts I have been seeking to convey, the notion of taking a “risk” in order to “lead” better signifies this theory structure.  Risking in order to lead presupposes that we take a risk in being “real” and “genuine” in a world where honesty, compassion, and honor are not highly prized values.   The leadership I am referring to is first and foremost “leading yourself” to walk, talk, and breathe the values you espouse – and extending this out into all relationships and encounters you may have with others along the path of life.

I also changed the name of “Inspiring Communication” (IC) to “Reviving Communication” (RC) in order to avoid the inherent confusion of “Integrating Character” (IC), hence the double IC-IC.  Additionally, I also changed a sub-factor within Integrating Character, namely, “diligence” was replaced with “commitment.”  I changed this because I consider “commitment” to be more foundational, while also encapsulating the essence of diligence within itself.  For example, to be committed to someone or to something means that (a) you will naturally take the time and care to properly understand it or them, (b) you will organize your life in such a way to tend and cultivate what you are committed to, and (c) you will follow through on your commitment despite various costs and difficulties.  Therefore, commitment entails understanding, attentive care, and sacrifice.

This question is for any leader in any field, and can be translated into any situation…

How can you train someone for a leadership role in the absence of commitment?

Just think, how can you maintain a marriage in the absence of commitment?  How can a teacher effective teach their students, if their students lack sufficient commitment to mastering the material?  The reality of this principle is so pervasive if we think to consider its applications.  How can you educate a community to better themselves if they are not interested in help?  How can you effectively help get someone off drugs or alcohol if they are not committed to the change?  How can you effectively teach and train disciples in the absence of their commitment?  Commitment is central to our lives on many levels.

 

Now I am going to give a brief recapitulation of this theory in its practical context of life.

Integrating Character (IC) is the core foundation for which we build our lives.  Honesty is the most fundamental aspect of humility.  There is a saying in 1 Peter 5:5 that says, “Be clothed with humility, for God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble.”  The potent power of being honest with ourselves gives us the ability to examine who we are, why we are here, where we are going, what life is all about, what we stand for, what we don’t stand for, what our goals in life are, what our dreams, desires, failures, motivations—thus the good, the bad, and the ugly.  Unfortunately, the American culture does not support such a radical honesty, because if we were to step outside of ourselves and take an accounting of our souls we would be surprised.  Now I recognize there are different depths of this accounting, because for those of you interested in spiritual and moral transformation we must go deep down the rabbit hole (pun intended).  This would include taking ownership and eventually mastery of our emotions, our thoughts, our words, and the energies that are processed through our body-temple.  This is no small journey, but this journey of self-leadership begins with radical honesty with ourselves and seeking to see others and this reality for what it is.

Once we begin the process of investigating our intentions, motives, and why we speak and do the things we do – we need to add the element of commitment.  We must commit to this path, because without doing so we will simply give off the perfume of hypocrisy.  You have inherent value, and this gift of life that you have been given is most precious and deserves your deepest commitment and passion.  In our discovery of “coming to ourselves” (cf. Luke 15:17) we should exercise vulnerability because we honestly recognize our weaknesses.  Every human being on this planet has issues, no one is exempt from this reality.  In fact when you begin to look deep into the eyes of humanity, the inherent suffering that each of us have is clearly witnessed.  Therefore, vulnerability and compassion enables us to extend this open hand to others, in the silent honor that all the pretenses we hold up—just need to be dropped.  Let go of the facade, let go of the pretenses, the false projections—it is unbecoming.

So with our honesty and our commitment to refining our character by integrating ourselves so that we are whole beings living consistently in all situations, relationships, and communications.  The vulnerability to properly engage others respectfully will open our eyes and give us the resilience needed to successfully adapt ourselves by constantly learning, growing, and giving.  The aspect of resilience naturally leads into Adapting Competence (AC), because we must continuously seek to learn from the experiences we have in life.  You take yourself where-ever you go!  If you find yourself repeating unfavorable patterns in your relationships it would be wise to take heed, and examine yourself.

Adapting Competence contains the elements of Emotional Intelligence (EI), knowledge management, continuous learning or Kaizen, and various cognitive thinking styles.  These aspects relate to the cognitive and emotional building blocks that are necessary to (a) properly evaluate information [i.e. knowledge management and cognitive thinking styles], (b) understand and regulate our own internal states [i.e. EI], (c) properly understand boundaries and levels of relationship engagement [i.e. EI], and (d) to continuously grow [i.e. Kaizen].  Adapting Competence encompasses much more than these aspects because to flesh out Emotional Intelligence in its various categories and sub-categories is enough to keep us busy for some time, because it paints a usable model for examining ourselves and our relationships – so to not reinvent the wheel a link has been embedded to give you a good overview of the model.  Another reason why we need various cognitive styles is because language can be used to edify, tear down, or deceive—thus its necessary to learn reasoning skills, cognitive fallacies, and communication skills.

Reviving Communication (RC) simply means to bring life into your communication and into the relationships you find yourself in.  What are you passionate about?  Why?  Why?  Why?  We should be able to answer each of these “Why’s” because we should know what we stand for – inside and out.  We communicate this via our vision of the big picture, the overall strategic intent, and how this relates systemically to the rest of life – and we do this by being able to communicate on various levels from the global and abstract to the concrete and specific.

 

Risk to Lead Theory (RLT) is about you becoming self-defined by leading yourself and extending this humility and confidence in such a way so as to embody respect, honor, and dignity for each human being and their uniqueness.  You take the risk first, in order to lead the situation in such a way to create the space for psychological safety to take root for others to open up so they can express themselves more completely.  We all know the feeling of “walking on eggshells” but when you take the risk to lead—you create the tone, tempo, and space for greater possibilities to emerge.

 

 

Peace be with each of you – as you learn to harmonize the energies of your life…..

 

 

Risk to Lead Theory

A Theory About Leadership & Life – Part 3

In reflecting on this model of leadership and life it is crucial to keep in mind that life is not simply about skills of influence in order to generate the results you want in life—it is fundamentally about developing your character and the character of others. Therefore, in the visual model the core structure from which all other “building” takes place is by working on your character, namely, the aspect of yourself that serves as the filter of perception whereby you classify meaning, motivations, and intentions.

If you were to know all the models of influence and have some degree of mastery over them there are still two major caveats of consideration. (1) The tools of influencing others are readily available, but without the proper intentions, and motives, and mission in life these “tools” will serve as manipulation tactics and strategies for unsustainable ends. This has several layers of un-sustainability, namely, (a) people usually know when they are not appreciated or valued, and (b) in treating people simply as a means to get what you want cannot and will not be a perpetual strategy for goal acquisition. Additionally, (2) without proper development of one’s personal character in utilizing these tools then when it comes to the long range of what life is about, and what every human being is responsible for and who we are responsible to – we should recognize that in the end…..death is inevitable. Thus, the life that each of us have in these bodies will come to an end, and it will not matter what we have acquired in life, but what will matter is the “seeds” we have sown into the hearts and minds of others as well as into ourselves. Some of you may think, my goodness Ra why this gloomy death talk…Well the emerging field of positive psychology has shown through research that contemplating our inevitable deaths will actually increase our gratitude and appreciation for the life we have now, and can free up the cognitive and affective resources needed to truly reflect on what is most important to us, and what we are seeking to create (Frias, Watkins, Webber, & Froh, 2011). I wanted to frame this final part of Inspiring Communication (IC) by embedding within it the core aspects of our personality and character development that is much more significant in terms of being able to generate sustainable results—both personally and socially.

The primary characteristics of Inspiring Communication (IC) with (a) vision, (b) strategy, (c) systemic, and (d) the ability to communicate on various levels – all have a wealth of literature already written about each them. My goal is not to provide a comprehensive definition and knowledge base for each, but my goal is to provide a working knowledge that can be used in a practical manner for everyday life.

In short, vision is the ability to generate the end result goal. Strategy is the ability to discover the bigger questions that must be asked in order to “define” the vision. Systemic refers specifically to the various levels and inter-relationships of life such as the various levels and inter-relationships of: ourselves, family, business, culture, society, global, etc. The ability to communicate on various levels comes by becoming self-defined (i.e. by consciously knowing who you are, what you stand for, where you come from, and where you are going) and embodying the systemic nature of life. For example – when we think about our own lives we can see that we have several roles that we manage (i.e. spouse, parent, career, etc.) and that embedded within each role we have our own expectations, desires, outcomes, feelings, beliefs, etc., that we bring—–and remember within your mental space that so does every single person you meet [with varying degrees and commitments of course—see Integration: August 2012].

Vision requires that you develop your imagination, your ability to think symbolically, your ability to make connections between seemingly unrelated concepts [see Adapting Competence]. Vision is the development to know where you want to go and where you are going, and this concept of vision has been extracted primarily from business phraseology and translated into developing a personal vision, a family vision, to a study-group vision, to a church or non-profit vision, etc. Although the concept of “visions” has been around for millennia in seeking to discover or knowing a path that a person or people group should take. However, vision and strategy are closely linked together because developing a strategy requires you or a business to ask the big questions. These questions are “big” because they do not focus on the fine details or tactics of direct implementation but refer to the overall course and direction in life or in business. From a business perspective this means defining what business you are really in, what you can be the best at, how you can meet the needs and desires of your potential customer base, and how you are different than any competitors. In your personal life, strategy refers to you asking yourself key questions about yourself.

As noted in previous postings such as “Blinded by Vagueness,” “Potential Tyranny of Generalities” and “Shared Meaning” is that when we don’t invest the time to really question our business or our life of what we stand for, why we stand for it, etc., then we tend to go through life responding to events on an auto-pilot, or what social psychologists refer to automaticity (Bargh, 1982; Bargh & Chartrand, 1999; Moors & De Houwer, 2006). The commitment, resilience, and discipline required to master oneself are well-worth the struggle, rather than going through life mindlessly.

Please keep in mind that each layer of Emergent Leadership builds on each other; therefore, the internal locus of control and resolve mentioned in Integrating Character (IC), and the skill building of Adapting Competence (AC) are integral components of Inspiring Communication (IC). To know where you want to go in your life and/or business is necessary, because once you have committed to a direction and potential possibility you can begin the process of strategy-mapping which will help you to define how the vision will be realized. The systemic element of Inspiring Communication (IC) is to flesh out the finer details of your vision and strategy for mapping the vision. Understanding the systemic nature of relationships is so crucial, because as family system therapy recognizes that the standard reason why a child acts out is because the parent either models the behavior for the child, or the child does not receive what they need from the parent (i.e. problem solving skills, attention, etc.) and then they find coping mechanisms in order to solve their problems which often turn out to be negative. Those who have dogs that are out of control simply need to learn a few skills in order to restore the proper boundaries and roles in these relationships.

The ability to communicate on multiple levels is obviously necessary for any parent, leader, or politician. Think about it…When you want to gain agreement you focus on the big picture and use ambiguous words such as: hope, change, positive results, taking responsibility, etc. These particular words all of us can agree are both good and edifying. However, when you begin to closely examine what these words actually mean in context of how they are directly applied we can often see that the finer details of what people mean when they say “change” or “positive results” may have different meanings than you initially believed them to be. To communicate on multiple levels requires you to understand where people are at, namely what are their roles and responsibilities. As a leader, you don’t want to discuss your personal problems with your spouse to other employees. What this refers to is having discernment in maintaining proper boundaries between roles, and not directly to communicating on multiple levels.

Communicating on multiple levels means that you are able to address the various dimensions of a person. You can speak to the heart, and/or the head, or to possibilities, or to loses, or to pressing needs, changes, purposes and missions, what is not-permitted, etc. Therefore, to communicate effectively is to recognize potential objections and acknowledge them up-front, and it also requires you to understand the needs of others. Keep in mind that we each have the same needs, but we just seek them out in different ways. For example, we all need certainty and to feel appreciated, but we each have different degrees of these needs, and we often seek or receive them in differing ways. However, since people are usually untrained experts at reading others, and generally know when they are not being valued or understood—it is necessary to develop one’s character to step beyond the boundary of oneself and have true respect and dignity for all people. When you genuinely honor another person – they usually sense it.

Understand where you want to go and why, define the strategies (big picture) and tactics (details) for getting there while keeping in mind the systemic-relationships that influence you, your business, your family, your community etc., and then communicate in such a way to others that clearly defines that you care about each of them individually and what is required of you and them to actualize the vision.

 

In the coming post(s) – I will refine this model more by changing its name, refining a few concepts, and bringing greater clarity as to how this model integrates into everyday life for each of us.

Peace be with you.

 

 

References

Bargh, J. A. (1982). Attention and automaticity in the processing of self-relevant information. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 43(3), 425–436.

Bargh, J., & Chartrand, T. (1999). The unbearable automaticity of being. American Psychologist, 54(7), 462-479.

Frias, A., Watkins, P., Webber, A., & Froh, J. (2011). Death and gratitude: Death reflection enhances gratitude. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 6(2), 154-162.

Moors, A., & De Houwer, J. (2006). Automaticity: A theoretical and conceptual analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 132(2), 297-326.

 

Emergent Leadership

Interlude

Greetings unto all who have read this blog and received something beneficial from it.  I appreciate your kind support, it means a lot.  The interlude for approximately 3 years has been formative for me in many respects.  So I hope to continue this blog, and share with all who may come across it – words of encouragement and practical tools that each of us can implement to enrich our lives and hopefully the lives each of us touch through the course of our short time here on this planet.  You will begin to notice that in time I will begin to transition the focus of this blog toward more of a spiritually minded focus since the Mission of this blog is devoted to personal and social change via personal development, moral development, and spiritual development for the individual and their relationship with others and the situational environment they find themselves in.

 

Life is wonderfully simple and yet complex – and I hope that in the posts and dialogue that are to follow and in the years to come — we can all begin to take ourselves, our relationships, and God more seriously.  Of course, I mean this in the spirit of deeper gratitude, appreciation, and reverence – not grudgingly, but joy-filled seriousness.

 

Peace be with each you…

A Theory About Leadership & Life – Part 2

In part 1 of this series a model on leadership and life was discussed – focusing upon the first core construct “Integrating Character.”  Now, the next general construct in the model Emergent Leadership refers to “Adapting Competence.”  Adapting Competence can sound like a fancy way for doing the things you already do, and in some way it is, but in another context it refers to the mindful application of effectively engaging the life situations, problems, demands, and needs of your life experiences.  I am specifically referring to your life experiences in the framework of intra-personal, that is, how you relate to yourself; and inter-personal, that is, how you relate to others.  When we are honest with ourselves, we can begin to identify a clear momentum in our lives, and this momentum is the comfort and almost habitual drive to do things the same way.  Some of you may say…no, no, not me Ra; or some of you may say, yes I can see what you are saying.  Let me clarify, this habitual momentum to do things the same way (relatively speaking) gives us predictability in our lives – if I do this then that will happen, or if I say this then they will probably say that…This drive for consistency is useful (at times) because it allows us to have some relative control over our outcomes, and this good; however, the ability to do something different or say something different opens us up to uncertainty and ambiguity.  Again, at times the ability to do or say something different is not useful nor needed; yet if we can step beyond the often mindless habit of consistency and certainty – then we may (a) learn new things, (b) make new distinctions, (c) have different experiences, and (d) form new competencies such as curiosity, creativity, and a general inquiry into the awesomeness of life.

Adapting Competence has four embedded sub-constructs or sub-categories that form this construct in action; therefore the pragmatic use of Adapting Competence as an ideal idea can be applied in life by exercising and flexing between these sub-constructs.  These sub-constructs are (a) various cognitive styles, (b) continuous learning, (c) knowledge management, and (d) self, social, situational awareness & management.  The latter (d) refers specifically to the working model of Emotional Intelligence (EI) with the added dimension of situational awareness and management.  Emotional Intelligence (EI) is often framed as four quadrants — (1) self-awareness, (2) self-management, (3) social awareness, and (4) relationship management (see above link).  Each of these quadrants are further elaborated upon to form a robust structure for explaining personal and social effectiveness.  Although EI as a great model and has been shown to produce results – it is important to remember that the utility (or usefulness) of any model depends on an individual’s willingness to experiment and utilize the information in order to build new habits.  In most leadership literature (of which EI is one of many models), and in particular change management literature spouts that over 75% of developmental programs fail.  So millions and up to billions of dollars are wasted each year on training programs that fail.  Interesting…Well the simple answer goes back to the first consideration at the beginning of this post – the momentum for immediate comfort and the habitual drive to do things the same way because the results are relatively predictable.  If this is the primary momentum in our lives, how do we change it?  Do we even want to change it, maybe you like where you are and perceive no need to adapt or reinvent yourself…?  Either way, the decision is yours, and the simple answer to how we change it – is commitment to change it.  This ‘begs the question’ well what is commitment, and how is commitment enacted.  This echoes back to the first primary construct of Integrating Character – with discipline, resilience, vulnerability, and honesty as the operative conditions or qualities to build new habits.

What is important to remember is that your beliefs, ideas, and worldview are not only cognitive functions free-floating around your head; but they are built into your very neurology–your nervous system.  Therefore, to behave in a new way it can feel in-congruent (in essence – IT IS), this is because to behave, think, feel, or speak requires specific neurons to fire in your body in very specific ways – and to engage in a new behavior there is no habitual neurological pathway to travel through; thus it takes time for a new neurological pathway to be formed.  This is another reason why change programs and training programs often fail, because what is learned in the “program” is not built into the day-to-day context of life-as-it-is experienced by the individuals undergoing the training.  And, another reason why these programs fail is because of the deep grooves built into the organizational culture or the situational variables that also drive behavior.

Back to the sub-constructs of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship management, and situational awareness.  Self-awareness hearkens back to honesty (Integrating Character) and being mindful of our biases, beliefs, opinions, ethics, values, habits, actions, words, thoughts, feelings, needs, motivations, and desires.  Self-awareness is dependent upon self-inquiry, self-knowledge, and mindfulness.  (a) Self-inquiry is about questioning oneself in all of these areas, (b) self-knowledge is about becoming clear on the answers we discover from our inquiry, and (c) mindfulness in the context of self-awareness merging into self-management is about “consciously choosing” to enact the values, beliefs, actions, words, thoughts, morals, feelings, and motivations that are aligned with your core sense of self—–core sense of self will be a future topic of dialogue…   Thus, self-management is a crucial step that requires commitment in order to actively manage oneself until new mental, emotional, and behavioral patterns are created.  This is where lip-service will not suffice, this is where mindful discipline is required to live and act from a place that is connected with our deepest values of respect, love, and dignity.  If a bias arises in our consciousness, then we redirect it; if an impure thought arises in our consciousness, then we redirect it; if anger or other negative emotions arise in our consciousness, then we redirect it.  For some people, the above suggestions are not practical nor useful – and I respect that, but for those who will not settle in life for anything but expressing their best selves in a life of service and love towards humanity – then this work is for you.  All of this carries overtones of spiritual development……

Social awareness and situational awareness have close correlations together.  Additionally, social awareness and relationship management become the most effective when you or me as the individual are able to put other people first.  Again, this is nice and fluffy in words, but the actual experience and expression of this in action requires that we know our true identity and mission in life.  How often do we ask our loved ones, “What do you expect from me as _____(your role)______?”  “How can I better serve or love you?”  “What has to happen for you to feel respected/loved/appreciated by me?”

In addition to Emotional Intelligence (EI); various cognitive styles can be employed to think and reason on various levels.  By utilizing various cognitive styles in action, it allows us to have multiple levels of perception.  If your child or friend tells you, “life is hard,” “people are mean,” “I don’t like school,” “I hate my job” – then by engaging in multiple cognitive styles you can think about not only (a) what they are saying, but (b) what they are not saying, or (c) what has to be going on in order to say that, or (d) what they are expecting from you.  Cognitive styles in particular represent various ways of seeing, interpreting, and making sense of experiences – and when multiple cognitive styles are enacted together it allows deeper decision making to occur because more information is pooled together in our consciousness to reason on multiple levels of analysis.  A common cognitive style is called conceptual complexity, which signifies the ability to think upon a range continuum of abstract to concrete unto concrete to abstract (cf. Kozhevnikov, 2007).  This can easily be expressed by the example…”I want peace, prosperity, and a sustainable future for our children.”  On an abstract level, most individuals on this planet would probably agree and say something like – “Yeh, I want that too.”  However, on a concrete level of interpretation, we must ask ourselves, “What does the speaker actually mean when he/she says ‘peace, prosperity, and sustainable future’?”  On an abstract level of interpretation everything looks happy and peachy.  However, lets say that the speaker’s true intentions for peace, prosperity, and a sustainable future actually means engaging in genocide and eugenics, for the purposes of population control to ensure ‘this future for their children’, not yours.  Now the picture completely changes.  This one particular cognitive style beckons us to “think.”

In addition to cognitive styles along with self, social, situational awareness and management, we come to the aspect of knowledge management.  The use of knowledge management is usually undertaken in business operations, but the principles can be utilized in our own lives.  The ultimate purpose of learning is to apply.  Thus, whatever is shared on this blog it is ultimately designed to be put into action and applied to our life experiences.  Knowledge itself is usually broken into two broad categories, namely, (a) explicit, and (b) tacit.  Explicit knowledge is what is usually taught in the schoolroom – math, history, and scientific formula.  Explicit knowledge can be easily transmitted between individuals because it can be placed into a textbook, it can be read, memorized, and duplicated.  On the other hand, tacit knowledge refers to lived-experiential knowledge.  This again, is why leadership programs or most developmental programs fail, because the knowledge that must be conveyed is tacitly learned, that is, it is learned via direct experience.  How do we teach another person to love unconditionally, or to express empathy, or to effectively teach our children, or to lead a department or company?  Sure, we can explicitly teach certain principles, but ultimately it depends upon experiential knowledge (tacit) and receiving feedback that teaches us these things.  However, some researchers have noted that there are ways to convey tacit knowledge in verbal format.  To clarify, tacit knowledge has two sub-categories (a) technical tacit knowledge–personal skills and crafts, and (b) cognitive tacit knowledge–beliefs, values, schemata, and mental models (Nonaka, & Konno, 1998).  The ability to manage these forms of knowledge for yourself and when trying to teach others becomes an essential part of what you already do, but my goal is to make these distinctions apparent so they can be better utilized in your life.

The final sub-category of Adapting Competence is continuous learning.  Continuous learning is primarily self-evident, and it represents the sub-category that overlays all sub-constructs.  This is because, by continuously learning we are curious about ‘what is’, ‘what could be’, ‘how things can be better’, ‘how things could be different’.  By continuously learning we remain as open systems that adapt new learning with existing mental models, or we eliminate outdated mental models that do not serve us or others.

Implicit in all of this is the willingness to discover anew or new patterns of perceiving and enacting in this world — in the pursuit of challenging the status-quo of ourselves, our relationships, our communities, our institutions, our educational systems, our religious systems, our scientific systems, our healthcare systems, our economic systems, our political systems, and our ecological systems.

 
References

Kozhevnikov, M. (2007). Cognitive styles in the context of modern psychology: Toward an integrated framework of cognitive style. Psychological Bulletin, 133(3), 464-481.

Nonaka, I., & Konno, N. (1998). The concept of Ba: Building a foundation for knowledge creation. California Management Review, 40(3), 40-54.

 

An Important Life Skill

“Always remember that one of your most powerful tools for genuinely understanding, learning, and developing any relationship is to ask questions; however, when asking questions make sure you ask them
 from the right heart, mind, and intention. An ideal intention should be to learn and to grow in love…and once you ask a question let the person fully answer while being fully present with them as they answer…”

 

 

~ Ra Lovingsworth